Book review: The Memoirist, by Neil Williamson

9 11 2017

Neil Williamson is a British speculative fiction writer whose work has been shortlisted for the British Fantasy Award, the British Science Fiction Award, and the World Fantasy Award.

TheMemoirist

The Memoirist is a novella set in a future England in which surveillance (by miniaturised camera-drones called ‘bees’) has become so pervasive as to almost completely nullify the concept of personal privacy. Its protagonist, Rhian Fitzgerald (‘Fizz’), is a compiler of memoirs (using, for the most part, material in the vast public domain which has arisen from such surveillance) for those who wish to codify, to celebrate, or to whitewash their past achievements. She takes on an assignment for Elodie Eagles, the frontperson for controversial and long-disbanded electrorock outfit The HitMEBritneys, whose final, undocumented concert, fifty years past, has become the stuff of legends; but when she seeks to obtain background information about this concert, her life is thrown into turmoil. Why are the police so keen to stop her from investigating this particular gig?

Omnipresent surveillance is generally seen as a trope within dystopian fiction—exhibit A, Orwell’s 1984—and yet the world of The Memoirist doesn’t convey as purely dystopian: while there’s much to be unsettled by within Williamson’s posited gamification of social interaction through surveillance, there is also a suggestion of comfortable societal adaptation to such conditions (which, of course, is itself grounds for further unsettlement on the reader’s part). In its blend of social-SF extrapolation and high-concept quantum speculation, it’s rather reminiscent of Greg Egan’s writing, and also rather good. I’m not completely convinced that the trope of ‘mysteriously epochal rock band performance’ (as featured in, for example, Howard Waldrop’s ‘Do Ya, Do Ya Wanna Dance’ and George R R Martin’s The Armageddon Rag) is ever applied with full success in speculative fiction, and The Memoirist doesn’t change my opinion on that score, but it’s nonetheless a detailed, plausible, and intriguing riff on where we could be heading.

 

 

 

 

 

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